Video 20 Oct 10 notes

Knocked up a boat cover out of left over roofing membrane and Gaffer Tape. Probably not the most waterproof or permanent solution but a good test run before I make the real thing next year. And the price was right.

The moorings are in, and I have been trailer sailing since the start of September. My new plan is to trailer sail April & May, mooring and local sailing for the summer months and trailer sailing again September & October. There is no sense in having her on the mooring during the week when the evenings are short and I can’t use her after work. Also, I am more likely to travel somewhere different to sail when she is on the trailer.

Video 16 Oct 12 notes

6th September, 2014.

No boom and no wind?? Tie the handle of an oar to a reefing point and pole her out!

Video 14 Oct 15 notes

6th September, 2014.

An aborted trip down west to Baltimore ended up with me catching my first bass! The weather was so manky setting off I decided heading up wind toward Galleyhead, which would give me the option of running home if things got too miserable. 

At Galleyhead, I stopped for lunch and a cup of tea under cliffs at the landward end of the peninsula. I looked up to see an odd figure at the top of the cliff. A headless figure!!

I caught the bass trolling a shallow diving plug along Longstrand on a reach at about 3-4 knots. I was only about 50 yards off the beach so I had an interesting time trying to get the boat to stop and real the fish in at the same time, without ending up on the beach itself!

I had never eaten bass before so I decided to keep it, and enjoyed a nice run back to Union Hall, the weather having dried up. The bass was delicious!

Photo 10 Oct 22 notes Trying to beat sunset…

Trying to beat sunset…

Photo 8 Oct 12 notes So this little guy and his buddies hang around my mooring! There were mackerel breaking around the boat as I was tying up so I tried to catch some with my LRF rod and I caught this little guy instead. Odds are it’s a pollock, it could be a juvenile whiting. One thing is for sure is that it’s tiny, so it went back in any to grow a little bigger/ get eaten by something bigger!

So this little guy and his buddies hang around my mooring! There were mackerel breaking around the boat as I was tying up so I tried to catch some with my LRF rod and I caught this little guy instead. Odds are it’s a pollock, it could be a juvenile whiting. One thing is for sure is that it’s tiny, so it went back in any to grow a little bigger/ get eaten by something bigger!

Photo 6 Oct 12 notes I think this is the first picture of an AWB on the blog. I took it because it was doing something unusual: actually sailing! Or so I thought. It’s impressive speed in the light northwesterly should have raised my suspicions. When it got up wind of me I heard a familiar sound - put put put - motor sailing!! It was long moored and it’s crew in the pub by the time I had given up sailing and rowed up the harbour. What I lacked in speed, I made up for in peace and quiet.

I think this is the first picture of an AWB on the blog. I took it because it was doing something unusual: actually sailing! Or so I thought. It’s impressive speed in the light northwesterly should have raised my suspicions. When it got up wind of me I heard a familiar sound - put put put - motor sailing!! It was long moored and it’s crew in the pub by the time I had given up sailing and rowed up the harbour. What I lacked in speed, I made up for in peace and quiet.

Video 3 Oct 16 notes

We have been experiencing an Indian Summer here in West Cork this September. Lots of sailing so, you might think? Well no actually. For the first 3 weeks of the month there has been a fresh south easterly blowing along the south coast. As high pressure stalled in the North Sea and low pressure stalled to the south near the Azores, West Cork ended up in the wind tunnel between them. South easterlies make for the most uncomfortable sea conditions off the south coast so I decided it was maintenance time!

Before I launched back in Spring, I stripped off all the varnish from the stern locker lid and replaced it with Deks Olje 1 & 2. I also replaced the varnish on Falcog with Deks Olje. It was in such good condition after the season I decided now was time to strip back the seats in An Suire and apply Deks Oje there as well. It is soooo much easier to apply than varnish and I reckon it looks better for longer than varnish.

Another great advantage to Deks Olje 1 & 2 is that it comes with instructions! Follow them to the letter and you’ll be grand. They state that 6 coats is enough, and that’s all I did last spring. It work perfectly. It has instructions for re- varnishing after the season. A quick wet sand with D1 followed by two coats of D2. Simple. Varnish is dead to me… 

I also painted the centreboard case cap and seat locker rail to save my back!

Video 1 Oct 3 notes

Video: Raymond Fogarty.

My neck of the woods! Features: Inchydoney, Galleyhead, Sherkin, Cape Clear, Mizen Head, Sheep’s Head, Beara and Bere Island. The music is a bit dodge, so no need for sound!

Photo 29 Sep 13 notes “Téann an diabhal san fharraige tar éis Lá San Mhicíl.”

— Old Cape Clear Islander saying.
Translation: The Devil goes in the sea after Michaelmas(29th September).
Source: Heir Island - It’s history and people(Eugene Daly)
Téann an diabhal san fharraige tar éis Lá San Mhicíl.
— Old Cape Clear Islander saying.

Translation: The Devil goes in the sea after Michaelmas(29th September).

Source: Heir Island - It’s history and people(Eugene Daly)

Photo 25 Sep 33 notes Picture: Rupert Manley.
Check out this newly launched St Ives punt. She was designed and built by Jonny Nance, founder of the St Ives Jumbo association. She is only 11 foot 6 inches long, but certainly looks much bigger. She has no centreboard either as St Ives is a drying harbour so she needs to be robustly built. I wonder how she goes to windward? Their Facebook is here. The newspaper article the photo features in is here.

Picture: Rupert Manley.

Check out this newly launched St Ives punt. She was designed and built by Jonny Nance, founder of the St Ives Jumbo association. She is only 11 foot 6 inches long, but certainly looks much bigger. She has no centreboard either as St Ives is a drying harbour so she needs to be robustly built. I wonder how she goes to windward? Their Facebook is here. The newspaper article the photo features in is here.

Video 23 Sep 12 notes

Peaceful….

Video 19 Sep 27 notes

So down past Castletownshend and home past a cow in a tree, a rusty thing, and some poles! A beautiful morning with beautiful light. 

Video 17 Sep 15 notes

And just when you think you are alone in a creek, out pops a little punt with an outboard! They had the right idea though!

Video 15 Sep 20 notes

Muddy creeks are the most serene and peaceful places you can go in a boat and Rineen Creek is no exception. I had known about the old mill above since I was a child but I had never seen it to this point. An old moss covered sign, pointing to the Old Mill Restaurant, that I passed every morning on the school bus - the only clue I had of it’s existence.

The sign stood at the junction of four roads, not quite a cross road as they were at odd angles and didn’t quite line up, just after a narrow s - bend between cut rock as you left the six or seven houses that made up Rineen. I sat elevated in the bus, able to see deeper into the fields I passed than I could in any car. My vantage point wasn’t good enough however to see that the creek ran the entire length of the wooded valley to the left of the road. Or maybe my attention always fell on the ruined house amongst the trees. Or maybe it was that I just didn’t expect the sea to be there at all, so I never looked down.

It was quite a surprise then, to find that the sheer rock wall at the top of the inlet wasn’t the end at all. The channel went off at a right angle toward another sheer rock face before continuing in the original direction right up under the ruined house tapering off below where the sign once stood.

The water in the creek was milky, with mullet occasionally breaking the surface causing ripples. It looked all the world like some backwater in rainforest documentary, only for the occasional rumble of traffic from the road above above. A tad cooler too!

Video 12 Sep 12 notes

14th August, 2014.

A relatively stable northwesterly took me on one tack all the way down to the base of Scullane point, where there is a beach I had been eyeing up as a possible camping spot on Apple Maps. Most disappointing beach ever! I chucked out the handbrake and had some lunch, before sailing back to Castlehaven, and then heading up the estuary on the flood tide. I had to put a reef in on the way through the narrowest part of the estuary due to the tunnel effect it had on the wind. Out went the handbrake again and it surprisingly held in the mud as I reefed. Past the narrows I entered the wide shallow part of the estuary up at Rineen and settled down in a quiet corner to cook my dinner. Well I thought it was quiet…

It appears I had intruded on this swans territory and he was not happy one bit! I ate my dinner while getting eye-balled and occasionally hissed at. I tried to bribe him away by throwing him bread, which he gladly ate before steaming straight back to the side of the boat to hiss again. After I finally finished my meal, I crept up to the bow pulled up the handbrake and gingerly sculled 20 feet to the shore. And my swan friend? Well it appears that making me move was the name of the game, and he won. Off he cruised down the shoreline!


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