Photo 24 Apr 3 notes Ever wonder what a two masted Ilur looks like? Here is John Hartmann’s Waxwing, looking gorgeous in the spring sunshine in Vermont. The thread of his build is here: http://goo.gl/EAhIfv

Ever wonder what a two masted Ilur looks like? Here is John Hartmann’s Waxwing, looking gorgeous in the spring sunshine in Vermont. The thread of his build is here: http://goo.gl/EAhIfv

(Source: forum.woodenboat.com)

Video 23 Apr 34 notes
Video 21 Apr 8 notes

I have sorted out my two anchors now too, following advice from “The Dinghy Cruising Companion”. They both have 40m of 10mm 3 strand as well as 8m of 6mm chain. I made a bag to store the rope part of the anchor rode as it is to long to coil. The rope simply gets pushed into one end, then the other, until it is stowed. Hopefully it will all come out the same way. I would have used a bucket, but that would have stopped the oars from being able to be stowed. The stern anchor is easier, the rope gets pushed under the floorboards at one side.

Video 19 Apr 10 notes

Another book and this one is a cracker! If you have any interest in trying out dinghy cruising this is the book for you. It is full of practical information and advice for beginners and the more experienced. I am going to keep my copy on the boat as a reference, it is that good!

The author is a guy called Roger Barnes and he sails an Ilur. It was actually through Roger’s articles in Classic Boat magazine that I fell in love with the Ilur design and decided it was the boat I had to build. But the book does not deal only with the Ilur dinghy however, it also touches on designs from the humble Mirror dinghy, to Wayfarers, all the way to more specialised camp cruisers such as the Norseboat.

After reading the book, I have actually had An Suire out of the water for a few days, making small improvements to make her a better cruising dinghy. I won’t be using all the advice in the book, or fitting An Suire out with all the equipment Roger uses in his Ilur, but he certainly gives food for thought. All in all the book is a great read and reference for the dinghy cruiser.

Video 18 Apr 35 notes

So here is the new mast partner set up in action. I went for a spin up the estuary toward Leap from Union Hall, which is normally blocked off by the bridge. It was just a case of tying to the bridge, dropping the sail and mast, then rowing up wind to get enough leeway to put everything back up again. Wind and tide were behind me on the way back, so I dropped the sail in good time, and just dipped the mast at the last second drifting under the bridge. Success.

Photo 16 Apr 9 notes I made a toggle to keep the oars tidy on the floorboards, yet make them accessible quickly. Stopping them sliding about also gives me a foot rest when the boat is heeling. The toggle itself is a bit of Red Deer antler. 

I made a toggle to keep the oars tidy on the floorboards, yet make them accessible quickly. Stopping them sliding about also gives me a foot rest when the boat is heeling. The toggle itself is a bit of Red Deer antler. 

Photo 14 Apr 28 notes Lugger on the starboard bow…

Lugger on the starboard bow…

Video 13 Apr 13 notes

Small improvements! Docking and anchoring. That ring will need to weather a bit though, way too shiny!

Video 11 Apr 18 notes

Bailing the boats on a soft day. Weather hasn’t been great since they went in, did manage to get out for one short evening sail though.

Photo 10 Apr 12 notes Fantastic poster for this years Baltimore Wooden Boat Festival by Gary McMahon of the Copper Reed Studio. http://www.copperreed.com

Fantastic poster for this years Baltimore Wooden Boat Festival by Gary McMahon of the Copper Reed Studio. http://www.copperreed.com

(Source: facebook.com)

Video 9 Apr 12 notes

If you have been following this blog for a long time, you will already have been introduced to the model of the Richard Hall. She is a mackerel drifter, built by the Thullier brothers in Kinsale, County Cork. These drifters were an evolution of the Kinsale Hooker, taking in influences from the visiting Nickey and Nobby style mackerel drifters in terms of rig and hull form, while retaining the counter stern of the hookers.

I was on the National Library of Ireland website the other day and I discovered that you can zoom in on the Fergus O’Connor collection photographs which have incredibly high resolution. So I zoomed in on the photo of Union Hall pier taken between 1900-1920 above, and low and behold there was S. 272, the Richard Hall moored beyond the pier. It is great to see her in the flesh in a port that she was supposed to have been based for a while. For the zoomable version go here: http://goo.gl/TxpZvA

The model itself has been scanned by the Traditional Boats of Ireland project, so her lines will be available for study and download here eventually: www.tradboats.ie. A half model of her sister ship the Water Nymph has been scanned and linesplan produced, here: http://goo.gl/fjfxe7.

Some more info has come to light since I first posted her picture:

She was launched in March 1886 under the instruction of Sir Thomas Brady prominent in the development of fisheries at the time.  She was planned for use off the Galway coast. She was a fine boat of 45 foot ‘length of keel’ and 15foot beam built of red pine on oak.  She had fine accommodation for 8.  The boat led to further commissions for the Thuilliers who received the congratulations of the Harbour Board and apparently favourable comment from no less then the Bishop of Galway.”

Some of you may have noticed that in the above photo she is ketch rigged in the photo while the model sports a dandy rig. The photo was probably taken 15 to 35 years after she was launched, so it would not be surprising that she had changed to the easier to handle gaff ketch rig. Those long bumpkins must have been very awkward!

(Source: nli.ie)

Video 8 Apr 11 notes

I’ve been making cleats over the last couple of days! They’ll be going on the inside of the gunwales to take dock - lines, tender - painters, etc. Just have to wait for some screws to arrive.

Video 7 Apr 33 notes

Dick from www.lodestarbooks.com sent me these pictures of his Aber ‘Teal’ that he is currently having built by Fabian Bush, www.fabianbush.com. Aber is Ilur’s slightly smaller, and dare I say prettier, sister. What a solid looking little ship she is! Dick is downsizing from 33ft yawl, which he only got to use sparingly due to a mooring constrained by tides on the east coast of England. With his new Aber, he can drive to where the tides are favourable. She will be finished in a teal green, with the sheerstrake, thwarts and floor boards oiled. I’m looking forward to seeing photos of her finished in a couple of months time!

Photo 4 Apr 8 notes Basking Shark Currach by Dorothy Cross. Her exhibition Connemara was showing in the Turner Contemporary in Margate in January. Article here: http://goo.gl/e2GEZQ

Basking Shark Currach by Dorothy Cross. Her exhibition Connemara was showing in the Turner Contemporary in Margate in January. Article here: http://goo.gl/e2GEZQ

Video 2 Apr 17 notes

I decided it was time to sort out my mast partner. Previously I used lashing which kept the mast up great, but made me think twice about taking the mast down. Ideally you should take the mast down every time you row the boat. It cuts the windage in half apparently. I copied the set up above off a boat on Francois Viviers website. We shall see how well it works in practice over the coming season.


Design crafted by Prashanth Kamalakanthan. Powered by Tumblr.